Capabilities

  • Difficult, Complex & Custom Stampings
  • Close Tolerance
  • Intricate, Small & Miniature
  • Thicknesses of Less Than .001″ to .250″
  • High Volume
  • Low Volume
  • Long Run
  • Short Run
  • Metal Rapid Prototyping
  • Cost-Competitive Solutions

Materials

  • Aluminum
  • Beryllium
  • Brass
  • Bronze
  • Cold Rolled Steel
  • Copper
  • Foils
  • High Temp Alloys
  • Insulator
  • Kapton
  • Magnetic Alloy
  • Mylar
  • Phenolic
  • Plastics
  • Spring Steel
  • Stainless Steel
  • Teflon
  • Tool Steel
  • Titanium

Industries We Serve

  • Aerospace
  • Electric Vehicles
  • Firearms
  • Fuel Cells
  • Marine
  • Medical Stampings
  • Medical Devices
  • Military & Defense
  • Nuclear Power
  • Recreational Vehicles
  • Solar Power
  • Surgical

Precision Metal Stamping Terms To Know

  • Blanking: A “blank” is punched out of a metal sheet during the blanking process, often the first step of the metal stamping process. The removed blank is the workpiece and will undergo further cutting, pressing, or forming.
  • Coining: Extreme pressure is applied to a part to shape it, reduce its thickness, and/or strengthen it. This process is used to produce precision metal components with fine features and detailed imprints.
  • Drawing: The metal stock is pulled, stretched, and compressed into a die’s cavity to form the desired shape and thickness, producing a 3-dimensional part.
  • Forming: This term encompasses all processes that form a flat sheet of metal into a 3-dimensional part. Forming operations include beading, bending, coining, embossing, ironing, piercing, and rolling.
  • Notching: A blank or part is punched to remove an edge or corner; the removed notch may be of any shape. Notching may be used at the end of a metal tube to provide a closer fit when it is joined to another.
  • Piercing The metal stock or formed part is punched to create slots, holes, or other openings. This process is similar to blanking, except in piercing the removed part is scrap.
  • Progressive Die Metal Stamping: Typically used for high-volume runs, this process incorporates multiple stations at a single die. Each station performs an operation (e.g., bending, cutting, drawing, piercing, punching, etc.); together, they result in a completed part.